Trippel Helix Conference on Computational Thinking and Digital Competences in Primary and Secondary Education

The conference focus on how to prepare our students in primary and secondary school for their future. Both national and international speakers present on the theme computational thinking and digital competence.

The background to the conference is the recent revisions to the curriculum for the compulsory school in Sweden where programming is now included from grade 1 and digital competence is emphasized much more.

Keynote speakers:

Jeannette Wing, Corporate Vice President, Microsoft Research who will talk about Computational Thinking.

Riina Vuorikari, Research Fellow, European Commission JRC IPTS who will talk about The European Commission’s DigiComp framework for digital competences.

Registration is now open, register for the conference here, lastest August 28th.

Program – Fredag 08 september

Please note:

Preliminary time table - subject to change

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09:00

Welcome and introduction

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09:10

Opening keynote - Jeannette Wing, Microsoft Research

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10:00

Coffee

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10:30

Session 1

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Computational Thinking Everywhere, Matti Tedre, University of Eastern Finland

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Teaching Computing - The Good the Bad and the Ugly, Arnold Pears, KTH Royal Institute of Technology/Uppsala University

Title: Teaching Computing – The Good the Bad and the Ugly.

Abstract: Teaching computing computing concepts and computational thinking in schools is a currently a high priority area for research, development and innovation in Swedish schools. The decision to include elements of computing and computational thinking in many areas of the school curriculum mirrors similar efforts in many countries, and poses challenges as well as offering many opportunities. Computing Education Research (CER) has a long tradition of research into learning of computing and computing concepts in tertiary educational settings. What can we learn from this considerable body of research to help us navigate the challenges associated with “computing in schools”? This talk draws on over thirty years of CER scholarship to discuss what research can tell us about what to do, what not to do, and where it can all go horribly wrong.

Speaker: Professor Arnold Pears, KTH, School of Education and Communication in Engineering Sciences and Uppsala University Department of Information Technology.

Bio: Arnold Pears holds joint professorships in Computer Science with specialisation in Computing Education at Uppsala University and Technical Science Education with specialisation in Engineering Education at KTH (The Royal Institute of Technology), both in Sweden.
He received his BSc(Hons) in 1986 and PhD in 1994, both from La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, where he occupied positions as lecturer and senior lecturer between 1991 and 1998. In 1999 he was appointed senior lecturer at Uppsala University, Sweden.

His awards include the Uppsala University Pedagogy Prize (2008), Uppsala University Excellent Teacher at Uppsala University (2012). He has served as a member of the Uppsala University Academic Senate, Programme Director for the IT Engineering programme, member of the selection committee for the Uppsala University Pedgogy prize and educational advisory board of the Faculty of Technology and Natural Sciences.

Professor Pears has a strong interest in teaching and learning research in computer science and engineering. He is Head of the Department of Learning at KTH, and leads the UpCERG research group in computing and engineering education research at Uppsala University. He has published more than 40 articles in the area internationally, and is well known as a computing and engineering education researcher through his professional activities in the ACM, and IEEE, where he has served as a member of the Board of Governors of the IEEE Computer Society, the steering committee of the Frontiers in Education Conference, and as Chair of the IEEE Computer Society Special Technical Community (STC) for Education. He is a Director of CeTUSS (The Swedish National Center for Pedagogical Development of Technology Education in a Societal and Student Oriented Context, www.cetuss.se) and the IEEE Education Society Nordic Chapter.

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A research perspective: Young children's learning and digital competence with tablets, Susanne Kjällander, Stockholm University

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The potential of digital tools for enabling the observation of comprehension in the secondary classroom, Lisbeth M Brevik, University of Oslo

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11:40

Panel discussion

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12:00

Lunch

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13:00

Session 2

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Hands-on in computer programming education: educational effects and brain processes, Anna Eckerdal and Kristina von Hausswolff, Uppsala University

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Digital Competencies From a School Technology Subject Perspective - More Than Programming, Claes Klasander, Linköping University

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Making room for pedagogical innovation: digital competence in teaching practice, Sylvana Sofkova Hashemi, University of Gothenburg

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14:10

Panel discussion

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14:30

Coffee

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15:00

Closing keynote - Riina Vuorikari, EU

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15:50-16:00

Closing

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